The squaddie and the squirrel: Soft-hearted soldier who nursed dying baby creature back to health by feeding it every four hours

By Daily Mail Reporter


A kind-hearted soldier rescued a baby squirrel on the verge of death and then nursed him back to health by feeding him every four hours.

Warrant officer Pyotr Pankratau was serving in the Belarussian army when he discovered the tiny baby squirrel under a tree.

Despite his military duties, Pankratau took him back to base and managed to squeeze in feeds of milk every four hours around his busy schedule.

Adorable: Warrant officer Pyotr Pankratau was serving in the Belarussian army when he found the baby squirrel under a tree

Best friends: Pyotr Pankratau and his squirrel Minsk are now inseparable after he nursed the sick animal back to health

Yum: Pankratau fed Minsk with baby food and milk every four hours until he got better

Incredibly, the baby squirrel made a full recovery and stayed with Pankratau throughout his two years of service in the army.

Pankratau named the squirrel Minsk - after the Belarus capital - and he now never leaves his side.

Minsk even accompanies Pankratau, now a taxi driver, as he drives passengers around the city.

He told Euro Radio: 'He was lying unconscious under the tree. There were worms in his mouth and right eye so I took them out. Two weeks later everything got back to normal.

Backseat driver: Pankratau left the army and now works as a taxi driver - with Minsk by his side

Kicking back: Minsk is well-trained and stays in his designated areas of the car

Popular: While Minsk mainly keeps out of sight of customers, the friendly squirrel is a favourite with children

Furry pals: The squirrel Minsk shares a snack with a feline friend

'I fed him with baby food and milk through a syringe every four hours.
'Then his teeth came out and he started eating himself.

'Half a year later I vaccinated and registered him.'

These adorable pictures show Minsk on his rounds with Pankratau who says he is well trained and sticks to certain parts of the taxi so he doesn't disturb the customers.

He added: 'I don't show him to everyone. Why disturb him all the time? I show him to kids.'

Hats off: One of Minsk's favourite places to have a nap is in Pankratau's military caps

Sleepyhead: Minsk is also happy to use Pankratau as a pillow if there aren't any hats around

Domesticated: Minsk is now a house squirrel and lives indoors


source:dailymail












Eats, shoots and cake: The peckish pandas who love nothing more than tucking into sweet treats

9:07 PM Posted by ms.tk 0 comments
By Emma Clark


Everybody deserves a to treat themselves with a slice of freshly baked cake now and again - even a group of playful pandas.

The gang of giant pandas were delighted to be included in the Mid-Autumn Festival celebrations in China yesterday, a public bank holiday in the country.

Staff at Chime-Long Xiangjiang Safari Park treated them to specially made Chinese 'mooncakes', a cake traditionally enjoyed by the population during the lunar harvest festival.

A cute young panda gazes up in hope at a 'mooncake' passed into his cage on the tip of a bamboo stick

A group of the hungry giant pandas quickly gather to tuck into the sweet treats being handed out

The public watched on in delight as the individual cakes were passed on the tip of bamboo canes to the stars of the Chimelong Panda Centre, who were licking their lips in excited anticipation.

Amusing photographs show the group hungrily reaching for the sweet treats before playfully scrapping with each other for a bite.

But some of the lucky ones were pictured contently tucking into their share after sneaking off alone.

An eager panda licks his lips as the mooncake approaches, while the rest climb over each other to get closer

Not for sharing: A trio of the pandas playfully grapple over one of the cakes

The centre covers an area of over 10000 square meters with a setting of mountains and ponds as well as plenty of bamboo.

The Mid-Autumn Festival is one of the most important holidays in the Chinese calendar, celebrated on the fifteenth day of the eighth lunar month, where the population enjoy matchmaking dances, fire dragon displays and lighting lanterns as well as admiring the full moon.

Finally... one of the contented pandas gets a moment of peace to enjoy his afternoon tea alone


source:dailymail



Saved by the bacon! Pig swims to the rescue of baby goat who got stuck in pond at petting zoo

By Daily Mail Reporter


Charlotte the spider comes to the aid of her pig friend Wilbur in the children's classic, but now the roles have been reversed in a real life rescue.

A video posted on YouTube shows a piglet paddling to the aid of a baby goat who was stuck in a pond at a petting zoo in the U.S.

In the short clip, filmed by a visitor, a young goat squeals as it appears to have got its hoof stuck under a rock in the water.

SCROLL DOWN FOR VIDEO

Frantic: The stranded goat bleats and bucks as it appears to be stuck in the pond

To the rescue: The little pig jumps in to save his friend

Seconds later, a young pig jumps in the water on the other side of the pond, paddles over, and nudges his young friend.

Apparently the force of the pig was enough to free the goat, as they both are able to swim out to safety shortly after.

Helpful nudge: The pig swims up to the goat and seems to simply push the goat till he is free

Victory lap: The two barnyard pals walk out safe and sound

The pig returns back towards the gathered crowd as the man with the video camera chuckles: 'And there he is, the hero pig!'

The video does not specify the name of the petting zoo where the rescue took place though the narrator's American indicates that it is somewhere in the U.S.

VIDEO: Moment adorable hero pig saves baby goat from drowning!




source:dailymail

Are you my new mummy? The moment wide-eyed orphan chimp meets his adoptive mother for the first time

By Sara Malm


This is the moment a wide-eyed young chimpanzee meets his adoptive mother for the first time.

Little Ruben lost his biological mother Rukiya when he was less than a day old and after her death his father rejected him.

The eight month old chimpanzee was treated roughly by other primates at a Florida zoo leading his keepers to begin a desperate search to find him an adoptive family.

Hi mum: A photographer captioned the moment Ruben met his new adoptive mother at Oklahoma City Zoo

Unfortunately the staff at Lowry Park Zoo, Tampa was in for an upward struggle after a failed adoption left Ruben alone again.

Finally, after yet another search across U.S. zoological parks they found an adoptive mother - Kito in Oklahoma - and Ruben moved to his new family a few weeks ago.

Now the little chimp is smiling and playing in his new home, hugging his new mother and getting up to mischief with his siblings.

Oklahoma City Zoo runs a successful surrogacy program for abandoned animals.

Giddy up mummy: Chimpanzee Ruben hitches a ride on his surrogate mum Kito's back in his new enclosure

Finding a home: Ruben had one failed adoption attempt behind him when he went to meet his new mother Kito

Robin Newby, Oklahoma City Zoo Great EscApe supervisor, said:’It's rewarding when we can create a family for these endangered and at-risk animals.’

Laura Bottaro, Oklahoma City Zoo mammal curator, added: ‘Our Zoo has had two successful chimpanzee surrogate situations and we are gaining a good reputation among accredited zoos for our surrogate program.’

Explorer: Chimpanzee Ruben seen walking in his enclosure at Lowry Park Zoo before his move to Oklahoma

All smiles: After his mothers death and his fathers rejection, little Ruben is happy again with his new family

Alan Varsik, Oklahoma City Zoo deputy director, said: ‘The big benefit of being accredited by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums is collaboration with other zoos.
‘This is especially true for the well-being of our animals, such as being able to provide the long-term social health of this infant chimp, Ruben.’

New family: Chimpanzee Ruben, his surrogate mother, Kito, and new sibling Siri

Monkeying about: Ruben happily playing peek-a-boo with his new keepers as her settles in with his family



source:dailymail


Mudd the bouncing bulldog: Hilarious video shows mischievous mutt jumping on a trampoline

By Jill Reilly


After a lifetime of walking on solid ground, Mudd the bulldog could be forgiven for not taking to a trampoline, but as this amusing video shows, he grabbed the chance to showcase his acrobatic skills.

In the 1.23 minute clip, which has become an instant hit online, Mudd is lifted on to the trampoline by his owner.

As soon as his paws hit the sprung floor, he bounces up and down in excitement, turning in quick circles.

Scroll down for video

Bouncing bulldog: Mudd does a backflip on the trampoline


Keep following me: Mudd pauses to check his owner is still videotaping his trampoline antics

Springing fun: Mudd bounces on to his side before jumping straight back up

It looks like this may not be his debut on a trampoline as the mischievous mutt then attempts some impressive moves.

He does a speedy side flip as well as a back-flip, each time springing up quickly from the material.

Mudd then begins to pick up pace as he launches himself at the floor beneath him, yelping in enjoyment.

Taking off: Mudd launches himself through the air

Action dog: Even when he ended up at odd angles Mudd did not seem perturbed

Ready to play: Mudd is lifted up to reach the trampoline

He then performs somersaults through the air, all the time barking loudly.

At some points, he pauses briefly with his tongue hanging out and then dives at the floor, ready to spring back into place.

The video has attracted hundreds of comments on YouTube.

DGCSCO wrote: 'THAT is one happy dog! That was also the funniest thing I've ever seen a dog do! Great dog you have there!!'

While another user JamesyB wrote: 'He looks like he is absolutely loving that - what fun!'

VIDEO: Presenting Mudd the bouncing bulldog...





source:dailymail

Heartwarming moment dog is reunited with family FOUR YEARS after she went missing in America

By Daily Mail Reporter


A family has been reunited with their dog nearly four years after she vanished thanks to a microchip - and the kindness of a stranger.

The Metcalf family, from Raleigh, North Carolina, thought they would never see their beloved pet, nine-year-old Cassie, again after she wandered off while staying with another relative.

Although they have no idea where she spent the last few years, what they do know is she wandered into the neighbourhood of Cheryl Smith two weeks ago.

Scroll down for video


Who's that? Brandy Metcalf leans down to her dog Cassie after nearly four years apart

I remember! Cassie, who vanished while staying with a relative, walks to her owner to say hello

The concerned resident of Gaston County, which is more than 190 miles from Raleigh, noted the dog did not have any collar or identifying tags - but she refused to take her to a shelter.

Instead, she took Cassie to numerous veterinarians in the hope one would have records for her and lead them to her owner.

They discovered she was micro-chipped and, although the Metcalf family had changed their address, managed to track them down in Raleigh with the help of the Gaston County animal shelter.

'I felt like if it was my dog I would want someone to do that for me,' Smith told WBTV.
She called the family to say they had found the dog - and found Cassie's previous owners in shock.


It is you! The dog ended up more 190 miles away - but no one knows where she has been in that time

Back with the family: The Metcalfs made a fuss of their dog - and warned her she has new fellow pets at home

'The wife could not even speak because she was in tears,' Smith said. 'She handed the phone to her husband.'

A few days later, the family drove to collect their beloved pet, emotional that they would finally be reunited with the dog they had had since she was a puppy.

While Cassie looked apprehensive at first, she soon recognised her old family, pouncing all over them and licking their faces.

'Oh my gosh this is the best day of our lives,' said Brandy Metcalf, adding that their dog is a little slimmer and slower, but definitely still the same family pet they remember.


Missed: They show off pictures of a younger Cassie, who joined the family when she was just a puppy

Savior: Cassie was found by Cheryl Smith, pictured, who took her to the vets and discovered she had been microchipped. With the help of a local dog shelter, she tracked down the family

'Ms. Smith is just a saint. I can't even explain what they've done for us. We are thrilled and grateful and in debt to them.'

Her husband David added: 'I only wish I could see it through her eyes to find out what she experienced. This reminds me of a Disney movie.'

The family said they were relieved they had micro-chipped their dog, but added it is important to keep the information updated to make reunions more speedy.

See below for video




source:dailymail

The real doggy paddle: The pets taking the plunge with their underwater antics

8:34 PM Posted by ms.tk 0 comments
By Kerry Mcqueeney


With a look of steely determination, these pets perfect their doggy paddle as they dive head first into a swimming pool to retrieve their beloved ball.

Anyone with a dog will know the lengths it will go to fetch something thrown for it. And these heart-warming images show nothing stands in their way - not even water.

These canine warriors pounce into the pool with their eyes firmly fixated on the prize.


Making a splash: These dogs will stop at nothing in pursuit of their beloved ball - and photographer Seth Casteel was on hand to capture these hilarious moments


Eye on the ball: This dog means business as he dives head first into the water after the toy


Taking the plunge: A combination of both facial expressions and underwater movement makes for a amusing - and sometimes bizarre - image

Taking the photographs underwater, the artist has managed to capture images that will keep a smile on your face all year round

Some of them bare their teeth, others open their eyes as wide as possible while one or two get caught up in a frenzy of bubbles.

These images are the handiwork of photographer Seth Casteel, who has captured the moment the water dogs take the plunge.

Seth has turned the incredible photographs into a heart-warming calendar, sure to keep a smile on your face all year round.

Based in Los Angeles and Chicago, Seth's photography agency specialises in lifestyle pet photography, embracing the 'at-ease' mentality of pets on location in the natural surroundings.

He enjoys working with animals whether he's on location in Beverly Hills photographing a pampered pooch or volunteering at the local shelter taking pictures of dogs and cats to give them a better chance of finding homes.


The real doggy paddle: The look on this pet's face is one of pure determination as it reaches out for the ball with his paws


Two can play at that game: It's double trouble as this pair both go for the ball as it bounces into the pool


Some of them bare their teeth, others open their eyes as wide as possible while one of two get caught up in a frenzy of bubbles


If you're an owner of a ball-loving dog, you will know what lengths your pet will go to to retrieve one that's been thrown for them


source:dailymail

Hunting school on the plains of Africa: Stunning images capture nature at its most raw as cheetah cubs learn how to catch a gazelle

By Phil Vinter


Pitching a gangly-legged gazelle against the fastest land animal on the planet hardly seems like a fair fight.

But despite their lightning speed and physical prowess it is the cheetah not the gazelle that is endangered and so if the species is to survive it is vital for young predators to master the art of hunting.

These stunning images capture the moment a trio of cheetah cubs chase down a juvenile Thomson's gazelle in a display of the raw survival skills required in the natural world.

Hunting practice: These stunning images capture the moment a trio of cheetah cubs chase down a juvenile Thomson's gazelle in a display of the raw survival skills required in the natural world

The gazelle had previously been caught by the mother of the young animals, but instead of killing the animal herself, she released it to give her offspring some valuable hunting practise.

Seemingly a hugely one-sided fight, the sacrifice of the gazelle, whose numbers are flourishing on the African plains, is crucial to ensure the survival of the at risk cheetah species.

The stunning images were captured by Exodus tour guide and wildlife photographer Paul Goldstein.

He said: 'Currently there are four mums with cubs I have been working with. It is cold in the morning at this time of year so they are often difficult to find, but once they liven up they can be very entertaining subjects.

'The cubs range from eight weeks to six months. A particular highlight, although brutal, was the one mother teaching her very young charges basic hunting skills, by giving them the present of a young gazelle fawn she had just downed.

'It is often hard to watch, but cheetahs are desperately endangered, whereas Thomson's gazelles are not - the day we run short of those fleet-footed antelope, we really have screwed up the planet.'


Closing in: The gazelle had previously been caught by the mother of the young animals, but instead of killing the animal herself, she released it to give her cubs, which range from eight weeks to six months, some valuable hunting practise


Attack: Seemingly a hugely one-sided fight, the sacrifice of the gazelle, whose numbers are flourishing on the African plains, is vital to ensure the survival of the at risk cheetah species


Three against one: The stunning images were captured by Exodus tour guide and wildlife photographer Paul Goldstein who said that while the scene was brutal it captured nature at its most raw

On the hunt: Cheetahs kill their prey by tripping it during the chase, then biting it on the underside of the throat to suffocate it. The predator proceeds to devour its catch as quickly as possible before the kill is taken by stronger predators.

The cheetah is the world's fastest land animal, reaching speeds of up to 70mph, and they are easily capable of outrunning any other animal over short distances thanks to an ability to accelerate from 0 to over 62mph in three seconds.

They kill their prey by tripping it during the chase, then biting it on the underside of the throat to suffocate it. The cheetah proceeds to devour its catch as quickly as possible before the kill is taken by stronger predators.


Speed demons: The cheetah is the world's fastest land animal, reaching speeds of up to 70mph, and they are easily capable of outrunning any other animal over short distances thanks to an ability to accelerate from 0 to over 62mph in three seconds


source:dailymail