Er, actually, I think I'll just walk: Lady cyclist gets a swarm of bees in her basket

By Emily Allen


Forget Easy Rider - these bee-sy riders brought a village to a standstill when they swarmed all over a bike leaving one cyclist without any way to get home.

The excited insects turned the bicycle basket into a buzzing bomb the size of a football outside the Co-op in March, Cambridgeshire, yesterday.

Shocked shoppers gathered to watch the amazing phenomenon in the lunchtime sunshine as the humming bees clung to the cycle.

Buzz off: Thousands of excited insects turned the bicycle basket into a buzzing bomb the size of a football in March, Cambridgeshire causing a stir in the local community

Worried Carol Key, manager of nearby menswear shop Dobsons, said her bicycle was alongside the buzzing bike.

She said the bees had taken over a tree just yards away last week.
Ms Key said: 'It was not too bad when they were in the tree.


A pensioner looks at the buzzing bees from a safe distance. Worried Carol Key, manager of nearby menswear shop Dobsons, said her bicycle was alongside the buzzing bike

Up close: The bees swarm around the bike basket. Malcolm Jackson, a volunteer at an RSPCA shop, alerted police and was put in touch with beekeeper Edward Turner

'But now I've called Fenland District Council and was given some numbers of beekeepers.

'I was concerned that the cycle owner might come along and not notice the bees and get hurt.'

Malcolm Jackson, a volunteer at an RSPCA shop, alerted police and was put in touch with beekeeper Edward Turner.

Mr Turner, of Doddington, immediately went to collect the bees and taken them to his own apiary.

Mr Jackson said: 'I was very concerned about children going near the swarm after school.

'If they had had sweets with them the bees might well have been attracted to the youngsters.'

Help: A beekeeper arrived to remove the bees and took them to his own apiary before anyone was stung

Honey bees are not typically aggressive and won’t sting under most circumstances.

When they are swarming they have little interest in people as their priority is to set up their new colony.

Swarming is the natural way that a colony of honeybees reproduces and happens when a new Queen has been formed and is almost ready to emerge from her cell.

Unlike humans the parent Queen and flying bees leave their home rather than waiting for the offsping to leave and set up independently.

In preparation honey bees gorge on honey prior to their journey in search of a suitable nesting site. When they are ready to go the bees leave the hive and can appear as a cloud in the air.


source:dailymail

Lazing on the river, Sammie the seal soaks up the sun in his very own dinghy

8:07 PM Posted by ms.tk 0 comments
By Daily Mail Reporter


When it comes to relaxing, you’ve got to do whatever floats your boat.

For Sammie the grey seal, it means soaking up the sun in his very own leisure craft.

He was spotted basking in the dinghy at Dittisham in Devon.


Relaxing: Sammie the seal takes it easy in his very own dinghy on the river Dart at Gurrow Point at Dittisham, Devon


Like a film star: Photographer Peter Mackley said that Sammie launched himself into the boat like a small kid launching himself onto a lilo

Laid back: The seal uses the craft like a lounger to enjoy the sunshine

Moored off Gurrow Point at Dittisham in the River Dart, the bright orange craft has become like a swimming pool lounger for the animal as he dozes in the sun while letting the rest of the world drift by.

Peter Mackley, who owns the Gurrow Point private estate nearby, saw the seal flopping into the boat and grabbed his camera. ‘It was like a small kid launching himself on to a Lilo,’ he said.

‘He was lolling back like a film star.’

Sammie is a familiar sight in the Dart and before finding the dinghy, was often seen sunning himself on the shore.



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Viewers' outrage over harrowing scenes of day-old calves being lined up and shot DEAD just because they're male

8:01 PM Posted by ms.tk 0 comments
-Three Jersey calves were filmed being killed on the Channel 4 programme featuring farmer Jimmy Doherty
-Nearly 60 people complained about the graphic scenes aired at 9.30pm on Tuesday


By Paul Revoir


Alarming: Scenes on the programme proved too much for some viewers and the channel received 58 complaints

Harrowing scenes of newly-born dairy calves being lined up and shot dead simply because they are male have left television viewers sickened.

The images of three Jersey calves being killed were filmed to highlight the grim reality of the dairy industry.

The Channel 4 programme, featuring farmer Jimmy Doherty, was explaining how more than 90,000 male dairy calves are shot at birth every year because there is no market for them.

But graphic scenes of a ‘knacker man’ pointing his gun to the head of the calves and shooting them in their brains was too gruesome for many.

Shocking: Graphic scenes of a 'knacker man' pointing his gun to the head of the calves and shooting them in their brains was too gruesome for some

Last night Channel 4 said it had received 58 complaints about the first episode of Jimmy and the Giant Supermarket, while the media regulator Ofcom had received more than ten. Viewers described the footage as ‘sick’, ‘horrific’ and one of the most upsetting things they had seen on TV.

Channel 4 showed the slaughterman creeping up beside the calves, who were about a day old or younger, before pulling his trigger.One of the animals was seen collapsing, then the camera cut away to the face of the presenter as the other two were killed.

They were then taken away to be rendered down to tallow to fuel a Belgian power station. Mr Doherty was later seen planning to make his own range of meatballs in an attempt to tackle the ‘huge’ problem in the dairy industry of unwanted male calves.


'Jimmy and the Giant Supermarket' showed a dairy farmer slaughtering three young male calves at 9.30pm on Tuesday night

The programme, featuring farmer Jimmy Doherty, was explaining how more than 90,000 male dairy
calves are shot at birth every year because there is no market for them

The TV farmer suggested slaughtered animals could instead be raised for veal.

He said British rose veal was ‘high welfare’ but because of previous cruelty concerns around this kind of meat, male calves were still viewed as a ‘waste product’.

The scenes, which aired at around 9.30pm on Tuesday, shocked many animal lovers.

One tweeted: ‘Harrowing scenes of male calves being euthanised on Jimmy and the Giant Supermarket.’ Another said: ‘Had to turn that Jimmy programme over, they were shooting male calves who were only a day old! Beautiful creatures, so sad! Feel sick.’ A third added: ‘One of the most upsetting things I’ve seen in ages. Just awful.’ Others described the scenes as ‘pretty horrific’ as another said the calves ‘looked like Bambi’.


Support: Animal charities backed the decision to show the scenes. The RSPCA said it was important to raise awareness about how food and drink is produced

Upset: Many distressed viewers took to Twitter to express their feelings. One described the scenes as 'sick'

But animal charities backed the decision to show the scenes. The RSPCA said it was important to raise awareness about how food and drink is produced.

A Channel 4 spokesman said: ‘We feel it is important to show the reality of this practice to offer viewers a rounded perspective of the issues the programme touches on.

‘The programme went out after the watershed, was preceded by a warning and the animals were killed humanely by an expert.’




source:dailymail

Hammy's got talent! Intelligent hamster trained by owner to play dead when he 'shoots'

By Tammy Hughes


When Uggie the talented canine from hit movie The Artist was denied an Oscar some considered it to be ruff justice.

But now a new star from the animal kingdom is set to impress with its incredible acting skills.

This remarkable YouTube video uploaded by a content user known only as Athanasius Mike shows a brilliant performance by a pet hamster.

Scroll down for video

Showdown: The hamster looks intently at the 'gun' as its owner prepares to shoot

In the short clip the little rodent pretends to drop dead when its owner 'shoots' it with a gun.

Nearly 100,000 people have viewed the footage on the popular sharing site and more than 100 users have left various comments.

Including one who said: 'Thats no hamster, it's a hamSTAR.'


Bang! The tiny rodent pretends to be struck by a fake bullet and collapses against the wall

Talent: As the owner's finger disappears from the clip the hamster pretends to slump back against the wall and then flops onto the floor

And another who added: "Hahahahaha!This hamster is awesome!!!'

The film shows a menacing finger pointing at the pet who bravely stares down the barrel of the 'gun'.

But when the person pretends to shoot, by shouting 'bang', the clever animal falls backwards and slumps against the wall with its eyes closed.

It is understood that no hamsters were harmed in the making of this video.




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It's Mara-Donna! Hilarious video shows two-year-old elephant wowing crowds with her football skills before Euro 2012

By Rob Preece


Close control: Donna traps the football under a foot as she gets ready to start playing games

With Euro 2012 less than a fortnight away, England's footballers are doing all they can to impress before the big kick-off.

And judging by this hilarious video, it seems a two-year-old elephant called Donna has many of the ball skills that England coach Roy Hodgson is looking for.

The playful Asian elephant, one of the star attractions at Whipsnade Zoo, entertained crowds of tourists as she pelted a giant football about her paddock.

Scroll down for video

Heads up: Donna shows she is as impressive at heading as she is with the ball at her feet

Her impressive display of ball control included heading, passing between her feet and a nifty step-over.

She even managed a cheeky backheel before eventually falling into a heap on the floor at the final whistle.

Stefan Groeneveld, senior keeper at the zoo in Bedfordshire, said animals enjoyed taking part in ball exercises.

He said: 'The elephants love playing with their pilates balls and also a huge football which we have for them, especially two-year-old Donna.

'It's brilliant exercise for them, especially now the weather is nice and they're outside all the time.


Having a ball: Donna pulls off a skilful dragback during her amusing display at Whipsnade Zoo


Look what I can do: Donna backheels the ball, watched by her keeper Elizabeth Becker

Off the hoof: Donna breaks into a trot in the elephant paddock with the ball at her feet

'They can often be seen having a kick-about in the paddock on their own or with their keepers.

'Donna particularly loves playing football and is very skilful - she can do back-kicks and has a good aim.'

Donna is one of nine elephants who share a seven-acre are at the zoo, which includes a large grass paddock and two houses.

They also have three pools and mud wallows to play in.


Keep the ball: Donna uses her trunk to ensure she maintains control of her football


High five: Donna celebrates with keeper Darren Fellowes after another impressive routine


And relax... Donna takes a well-earned rest, but makes sure she gets to keep the matchball

Now watch the video...




source:dailymail

The leopard with a ladder: Wild cat given helping hand to escape slimy pond after getting into a spot of bother on tea estate

7:16 PM Posted by ms.tk 0 comments
By Julian Gavaghan


Help, I'm in a tight spot! A wild leopard after it fell into a water tank in Sangatram, north-east India

Stuck in a slimy pond, this leopard was certainly in a tight spot.

But the wild cat, who fell in the gungy reservoir surrounded by a 14ft wall, was given a lucky escape after rescuers put a ladder in the water.

Rescue attempt: A wildlife official wearing a crash helmet for safety throws in a rope and a net to no avail

The beast, who had been languishing in the tank for more than an hour, dully climbed out and disappeared into the forest near the tea estate in Sangatram, north-east India.

A team of foresters from the Sukna Wildlife Squad had earlier tried to pull the leopard out of water with a net.

Climb for freedom: A wild leopard scales the ladder and runs back off to the nearby forest

But the animal refused to let himself be caught. The ladder was a lucky last resort.'

No doubt it made a vow to watch its step in future.



source:dailymail

Cantastic Mr Fox: Cub rescued after getting his head stuck inside a tin and walking blindly along 30ft ledge

7:09 PM Posted by ms.tk 0 comments
By Tom Gardner


An animal rescuer saved the life of a fox cub that got its head stuck in a discarded tin... and almost plunged 30ft over a cliff in the process.

Wildlife Aid Foundation veterinary nurse Lucy Kells rushed from the charity’s base in Leatherhead, Surrey, when a resident spotted the cub in their garden with its head trapped in the empty can.

Despite its predicament, the cub was wandering around blindly and Lucy had to chase it into the bushes to catch it, unaware of the 30ft abyss a few inches away.


Canned: The fox cub had a lucky escape after getting its head stuck in an old tin can

Tight squeeze: Vet's nurse Lucy Kells came to the rescue and managed to pull the rusty can from the fox's head

She managed to clasp hold of a nearby tree with one hand and reach out for the sightless fox with the other.

Foundation boss Simon Cowell, who also went on the call, said ‘The next thing, I saw Lucy lying flat out, with one arm around the branch of a bush, and leaning over a thin wire fence that looked as if it was about to give way.

‘She called out "I’ve got him" but it was at that moment I saw that immediately beyond her was a 30ft drop.

‘Lucy is absolutely terrified of heights, but she had been so focused on saving the fox cub that she had not even noticed that there was a sheer drop.

‘She had got hold of the cub with one hand and the branch with the other. Luckily I was in the nick of time to grab both Lucy and the cub and pull them back to safety.’

The can was removed with the help of wife cutters and the male fox cub was released unharmed.


Call for help: The fox cub was spotted by a resident in their garden with its head trapped in the empty can


Relief: The fox looks a little worse for wear after being cut free from the tin can by founder of Wildlife Aid Foundation Simon Cowell, right



source:dailymail

You'll be blown away: Amazing photos of harvest mouse who climbed up a dandelion in the breeze

By Nick Enoch


The harvest mouse - one of Britain's most elusive rodents - was snapped at the British Wildlife Centre in Lingfield, Surrey, by head keeper Matt Binstead. It uses its prehensile tail as an anchor

As this tiny harvest mouse seemed to blow away a dandelion, who knows what it was wishing for.

These heartwarming pictures of one of Britain’s most elusive rodents were taken by amateur photographer Matt Binstead last weekend.

He said: 'It was lovely to get these shots of the mouse in its element. I saw it on the stem and just waited for it to climb all the way to the top.

'I can't remember whether it was the breeze or the mouse blowing the dandelion,' said Mr Binstead

'I can’t remember whether it was the breeze or the mouse blowing the dandelion.

'It is the only British animal with what is known as a prehensile tail that can be used as a fifth limb.

'When wrapped around a stem, it can act as a brake or anchor.

'This makes it very nimble, travelling and feeding in stems of cereals and grasses.'

Conservation measures have been in place for the species since 2001 when it was given near-threatened status.

It is Europe’s smallest rodent, at about 6cm long, and weighs less than a 2p coin.

They have many natural predators and are a snack for foxes, weasels, stoats, cats, owls, crows, kestrels and even toads.

The mouse is Europe's smallest rodent, at about 6cm long, and weighs less than a 2p coin

And many of them freeze to death in the winter where they live in grass nests in hedgerows near the ground.

The species don’t hibernate but do sleep for long periods in the winter, waking up during milder spells to eat a little stored food or venture out on a foraging trip.

Tennis balls used in play at Wimbledon have been recycled to create artificial nests for harvest mice in an attempt to help the species avoid predation at this time.

They eat mainly seeds and insects but also nectar and fruit and are found in areas of tall grasses such as cereal crops, and in roadside verges, hedgerows, reedbeds, dykes and salt-marshes.

Mr Binstead, 30, is head keeper at the British Wildlife Centre in Lingfield, Surrey, where the pictures were taken.

He added: 'They have a remarkable ability to sense vibrations through the soles of their feet.

'Larger animals in the vicinity can be sensed by vibrations passing through the ground and up the plant on which the mouse is feeding.'

Harvest mice breed from May to October, often producing three litters a year after a two-and-a-half-week gestation period.

The young are completely independent and are abandoned by their mother after 16 days.

The centre has been open to the public since 2000 and houses about 40 native species.

Maybe this little one was just wishing the lovely weather will continue.



source:dailymail

Shall I be mother? Man, 50, becomes unlikely surrogate to eight ducklings after injured mum abandoned her eggs

By Amy Oliver


Mother duck: Spanish guesthouse owner Ponce Risco has found himself raising eight ducklings after they were abandoned as eggs by their mother

When Ponce Risco noticed a mother duck had abandoned her eggs he decided to take them under his wing.

But the Spanish guesthouse owner from Longton, Staffordshire, didn't quite bargain for the demands eight ducklings can bring.

After watching them hatch and keeping them incubated, the daffy birds now think Mr Risco is their mother and follow him everywhere.

They are kept in a pen during the day but do get to stretch their legs when they accompany Mr Risco on his daily walk to Longton Brickcroft Nature Reserve.

Ducker up: Mr Risco keeps the ducklings inside his family home in Longton at night but lets them out into a pen during the day

Mr Risco, 50, said: 'They think I'm their mother I think, as long as they can see me they are fine but if I go out of site they start making a noise and panic and huddle together.'

He added: 'I didn't ask for this, I was just trying to help.

'We were here with the eggs and they take an imprint of the first thing they see.'

The babies' mother and father, named Shy and Handsome by Mr Risco, visit his garden every year.

But, in April he realised something was amiss when Shy abandoned her eggs. In a moment of panic Mr Risco, his wife Lisa, 44, and 15-year-old son Lewis, bought a second-hand incubator for the eggs.

Troupe: The ducklings are happy when they can see Mr Risco but when he goes out of sight they huddle together and start quacking loudly

They later found Shy injured in a neighbouring garden. And, while she recovered, the family decided to try their hand at looking after the eggs.

They bought a second incubator and soon the eggs began to hatch - leaving the family with eight ducklings.

Mr Risco is currently keeping the ducks inside at night time, in a part of the house that isn't finished yet and in the day time they are outside in a pen.


Horsing around: The ducklings walk outside Mr Risco's home as a horse rider double takes while trotting past

Nice weather for ducks: Once or twice a day Mr Risco walks to Longton Brickcroft Nature Reserve and the ducklings follow him

And, their real mother is still around. Mr Risco built a floating house for Shy on his pond and she sleeps there but tends to wander off during the day.

'Hopefully they will take off soon,' he added.

The family hasn't named the ducklings but they are able to tell a couple of them apart.

Mr Risco concluded: 'They are a bit of a pain but I would do it all over again.
'They have given us so much joy, they are fantastic.'


Hatchlings: After noticing the mother had abandoned her eggs Mr Risco and his wife decided to take them on and bought an incubator. Here is one duckling just after it hatched


Don't dawdle: Mr Risco said raising the ducklings had been a 'bit of a pain' but that he would do it all over again


source:dailymail

Think you've had a bad day at the dentist? Meet the tiger whose heart STOPPED while having a filling

By Ian Garland


Even the biggest creatures can be humbled by a toothache.

Vets had to perform CPR on a 160kg Siberian tiger after she suffered a cardiac arrest during a visit to the dentist.

Sayan was undergoing root canal surgery when she suffered a rare reaction two hours into the procedure.

Quick thinking medics at Yorkshire Wildlife Park gave the three-year-old heart massage and two shots of adrenaline and brought her back to life.


Toothache: Vets prepare Sayan for surgery. They decided to operate on her because she had been acting grumpily and showing signs of tooth pain

Complications: Two hours into the operation Sayan's heart rate dropped - due to a rare reaction

Sayan is now recovering from the traumatic dentist experience.

Vet Alan Tevendale, 31, said: 'We noticed a change two hours into the operation and found no pulse or heart beat.

'We then immediately started cardiac massage and gave a shot of intravenous adrenaline. When this didn't work we had to give another shot of adrenaline directly into the heart whilst we continued cardiac massage.'


Reaction: Vets quickly performed heart massage on her and administered two shots of adrenaline, which restarted her heart

Recovery: Sayan is now back on her feet after her traumatic brush with death - and zookeepers say she's already more cheerful

'When I checked again she had a pulse and heartbeat.

'Gradually, she returned to a steady rhythm. After five minutes we took her off ventilation and she managed to breathe herself.

'This is very rare and was extremely stressful – the most stressful experience of my life. We are all so relieved she is now ok.'

Sayan, who weighs around 160 kilos, had been acting grumpily and keepers at the wildlife park in Doncaster decided to get her teeth examined in case they were causing her discomfort.

A specialist dentist was called in last week to examine the tiger’s teeth
After a full check up he opted to perform a root canal filling to a lower canine.

But the operation which should have been straightforward took a dramatic twist.

'There is always a risk with anaesthetics but I have not seen this reaction in a tiger in 27 years and I have worked on hundreds of big cats.,' said dentist Peter Kertesz, who has a practice in Central London.

'The good thing is that we had the expertise to cope with the emergency and, although her heart stopped for seven to ten minutes, Sayan was in good hands and she has made a great recovery.'

Sayan came to Yorkshire Wildlife Park to live in Land of the Tigers last year as part of the Siberian Tiger Breeding Programme.

Fewer than 400 Siberian tigers are left in the wild because of habitat loss and poachers.


Breeding: Sayan came to Yorkshire Wildlife Park to live in Land of the Tigers last year as part of the Siberian Tiger Breeding Programme.

Big cat cupid: She has been paired up with three-year-old male Vladimir after they were introduced on Valentine's Day

She had been kept in a separate but adjacent enclosure to three year-old male Vladimir for eight months while they got acclimatised to each other before being introduced on Valentine’s Day.

Yorkshire Wildlife Park director Cheryl Williams said: 'We are extremely grateful for the expertise and speed of the whole medical team.

'They were brilliant in bringing Sayan back to life.'

'The welfare of our animals is our highest priority and I am delighted to report that Sayan is now back in the Land of The Tigers and seems much better tempered!'


Big cat: Siberian tigers are the world's largest cat. There are only an estimated 400 left in the wild



source:dailymail

Thrush hour: Bird makes makes nest inside TRAFFIC LIGHT at busy city centre junction

7:17 AM Posted by ms.tk 0 comments
By Matt Blake


A tangled mess of twigs, string and urban junk, this bird's nest may look bulky... but it's as light as a feather.

A plucky thrush has built her roost inside a traffic light on one of Leeds' busiest junctions.

She and her partner spent the last few days painstakingly piecing it together from whatever they picked up from around the West Yorkshire city's centre.

Red light: The plucky bird built her roost inside a traffic light on one of Leeds' busiest junctions

The refuge has become so large that it hangs precariously over both sides of the amber light's hood.

But in terms of food it is the perfect location.

The busy pair have been have been hunting for titbits from picnic crowds as the hot weather brings more people out.


Whatever the feather: The busy pair have been have been hunting for titbits from picnic crowds as the hot weather brings more people out

Thrush hour: The birds have caused quite a stir among commuters

The bird is very alert and pokes its nose inquisitively out of the nest at the sound of almost every passing footfall.

They are not the first lovebirds to get cozy in bizarre locations.


Life saver: Yesterday a coot was found to have made her nest in the middle of a floating life ring in London's Kensington Gardens

Patient: The coot spent weeks building the nest and then waiting for its solitary egg to hatch

Yesterday a coot was found to have made her nest in the middle of a floating life ring in London's Kensington Gardens.

And earlier this month staff at The Green Man, in Welling, Kent, were stunned when they discovered that a Blue Tit had hijacked a cigarette bin in their beer garden.


Home tweet home: Earlier this month staff at The Green Man, in Welling, Kent, were stunned when they discovered that a Blue Tit had hijacked a cigarette bin in their beer garden

Hatched: The chicks will be fed by their mother until they are old enough to leave their unconventional nest

The plucky bird clearly wasn't put off by the smell and made a makeshift nest out of feathers, twigs and moss.

And in the same week, a robin redbreast was discovered bedding down in a bookshelf in St Aldate's Church in Gloucester before successfully hatching three adorable chicks.


Comfortable: This cheeky little lady has won the hearts of a congregation at St Aldate's Church in Gloucester


Life jacket: A blue tit built a nest in an emergency life jacket



source:dailymail